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Swype

February 6, 2010

Swype is a great app for typing faster. It uses a technique where you don’t lift your finger but instead swypes it between the letters the word you want to type consists of. This works remarkably well. When many words match you get a list to choose from.

If the default word (chosen by Swype) is the correct one you can just continue swyping the next word. Also remember you don’t have to make a space after every word, just continue swyping the next and a space will be automagically added. Swypetastic, huh?

Swype is not in a final version yet but follow this guide to install it: http://droidmuff.in/downloads/swype-preview/

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Sony Ericsson’s Android UI

July 9, 2009

A video showing the new user interface of the Sony Ericsson’s Android phone (that we talked about a couple of days ago) is spreading around the web.

Sony Ericsson, as HTC did with the Sense interface, is therefore working on a customized user interface to add to its phones. If the video will be confirmed, the new system will be quite good looking (maybe not as good as the HTC sense) and intuitive and with more integration with social services like Facebook and Twitter.

/Zuli

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Alternatives to the Android Market

July 7, 2009

I guess some of you already tried the browser version of the Android Market (not the version available from an Android phone).  It basically sucks, it lacks many basic features like search, categories, user ratings and comments. It is not really clear why it is so, also because the phone version really works great.

So if you want to look for an Android application from your desktop, there are a couple of interesting websites you should check out: Cyrket and especially Androlib, which is very complete and also available in different languages.

/Zuli

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Android Developer Challenge 2

July 7, 2009

This august Google will launch the second Android Developer Challenge.

The first challenge (full results here) gave us many of the interesting applications available now on the Android Market, such as CompareEverywhere, ShopSavvy or Wikitude. The new challenge will be focused more on the users feedback: for the first round in fact, a special ADC 2 voting application will be available to download from the market, and will allow users to download and rate the applications submitted to the contest. This results will generate a list of the 20 top applications for each category that will then access the second round and will be rated by the users in the same manner. This final rating will contribute with the 45% of the final score, the other 55% left to a Google-selected judging team.

All new and unpublished applications can be summitted to the contest, and must run on Android 1.5 and be in English. Read the rest of this entry »

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Sony Ericsson’s first Android phone

July 5, 2009

Rachel

A danish site published the pictures of what the new Sony Ericsson Android phone (codename Rachel) will look like.

It is expected by the end of 2009 and it will probably run Android 2.0. The hardware specs looks pretty good, it will be based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon platform, so processor speeds up to 1Ghz, 3d capabilities, an 8.1MegaPixel camera with autofocus and flash, 3,5mm audio jack and mini-usb port. Not much is know about the screen details, it will be obviously touchscreen with no less than 4 inches expected.

Both the look and the hardware capabilites look pretty amazing, the Android phones battle is getting intense 🙂

/Zuli

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Archos media tablet

July 3, 2009

According to Pocket-lint, the 15th of September Archos will release an “ultra-thin Internet Media Tablet combined with a mobile phone” based on Android.

The device will have a high-resolution 5” screen, Adobe Flash support, 500MB hard-drive and a 7.2Mbps HSUPA connectivity.

/Zuli

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App development in iPhone vs Android

July 3, 2009

Wandering around the web I found this article: http://greensopinion.blogspot.com/2009/07/android-versus-iphone-development.html. The article talks about a comparison from software developer point of view of developing apps for iPhone and Android.

The chosen language for iPhone is Objective-C and for Android is Java. My opinion on this is : if you want a true comparison between the two platforms you should  stick to one language.  Here is a summary quote from the article:

Android’s platform and developer tools are excellent. Leveraging Java and the Eclipse IDE are major winning factors for Android. Apple’s developer tools are shockingly bad by comparison. The Objective-C language and platform APIs are cumbersome and poorly organized. Overall when developing for the iPhone I felt like I was back in 1993. These factors combined in my estimation make application development about three times more expensive when developing for iPhone. The only area where Apple’s developer tools excelled was in profiling and heap analysis.

/Teme